1-855-527-7464
Soil Testing And Boat Troubles

Soil Testing And Boat Troubles

Boat Issues and Soil Testing | Building The Homestead Series

Hello, friends! Ryan here from Backroads Homesteading. Today, I want to share some updates on our homestead journey, focusing on soil testing for our garden beds and our boat repair adventures.

Rumble Version – https://rumble.com/v4hmyo5-homestead-life-boat-issues-and-soil-testing.html
X Version – https://twitter.com/bkrdhomstd/status/1765448065907900603
Facebook Version – https://fb.watch/qEsLbBffsV/
Instagram Version – https://www.instagram.com/p/C4Lr5eIgwdy/

Soil Testing: Laying the Foundation for a Productive Garden

On the homestead front, we’ve been busy preparing our garden beds. We received some mulch from a new friend, which we initially planned to use for walkways. However, upon closer inspection, we realized it contained a mix of dirt, leaves, and other composting materials. We’ve decided to use this mulch in the bottom of our raised beds for a hugelkultur approach, which will help improve soil structure and fertility.

We also tilled some of the composting material into our clay-based soil to prevent compaction and improve nutrient availability. Our neighbor kindly brought over a tractor to help us work on the fence line, and we took the opportunity to finish collecting soil samples from our North Field.

After mixing the samples and removing any large organic matter, we’re sending them off for analysis. This will help us understand what amendments our soil needs to support a healthy, productive garden. We’re also making some adjustments to our raised beds, reducing their height from three layers to two to conserve wood and create more beds.

As we wait for the soil test results, we’re excited to start planning our garden layout and choosing the best crops for our soil conditions. It’s all about creating a sustainable, productive homestead that can support our family and community.

Boat Repairs: A Surprising Challenge

We recently noticed some issues with our boat, specifically in the battery chamber. Upon inspection, we found a significant amount of corrosion, likely caused by open-cell batteries leaking acid as the boat moved through the water. This was a surprising challenge, but we’re tackling it head-on.

To address this, we removed the tops of the batteries and cleaned out most of the corrosion. We’re now running baking soda through the chamber to neutralize any remaining acid. Thankfully, we haven’t found any holes yet, but we’ll continue to inspect and ensure it’s safe before reinstalling closed-cell batteries. This experience has taught us the importance of regular maintenance and checks, especially when it comes to safety on the water.

Stay tuned for more updates on our homesteading journey, and feel free to share your own experiences and tips in the comments. Until next time, happy homesteading!